Bob Thaler South Dakota State University

Resources Authored

Factsheets

Purchasing of High Quality Feed Ingredients for Swine Diets

Publish Date: 03/25/2010

Feed costs represent over 75% of the cost of raising pigs, and producers have many feed purchasing and production options to consider. Swine producers may: 1) choose to buy feed from independent feed mills, mills of national firms, or cooperatives; 2) buy premixes, base mixes, and/or supplements from various companies who also provide nutritional and technical expertise on the proper mixing and feeding of these products; 3) purchase individual raw materials and mix them to their own specifications; or 4) use a combination of these purchasing methods. However, many other services have been traditionally provided by feed companies, and their value must be taken into consideration as well when determining where to purchase feed. Ultimately, the final decision on these alternatives is in the producers’ hands, and it can have a tremendous impact on their profitability.


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Factsheets

By-product Feed Ingredients for Use in Swine Diets

Publish Date: 03/25/2010

Feed costs comprise approximately 65-70% of the cost of pork production. While most U.S. producers think of strictly corn and soybean meal (SBM) when feeding pigs, they need to realize that pigs require amino acids, energy, vitamins and minerals, and not any particular feedstuff for normal growth. In most regions of the U.S., a corn–SBM combination is usually the least expensive ingredient combination that meets the pig’s nutrient requirements. However, in times of higher corn and SBM prices or in regions of the U.S. that are removed from the Corn Belt, producers need to look at alternative feedstuffs in order to keep diet costs down.


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Factsheets

Swine Feed and Ingredient Sampling and Analysis

Publish Date: 03/25/2010

Preparing high quality swine diets is a complex process that involves several important components. Those components include ingredient procurement, diet formulation, feed manufacturing and delivery of the final diet. Careful attention must be given to the quality of the ingredients used to manufacture swine diets. The quality of the final diet also needs to be checked to ensure it is consistent with that of the original formula specifications or product description. Otherwise, optimal pig performance and economic outcomes may not be achieved. To ensure this consistency, a quality assurance program that involves product specification sheets, proper feed and ingredient sampling, analytical procedures and interpretation of laboratory results should be implemented.


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Factsheets

Utilization of Weather-stressed Feedstuffs in Swine Diets

Publish Date: 03/25/2010

In any given year, late plantings, cool growing seasons, early frost, and/or drought conditions occur in parts of the US, and this typically results in lower quality grains and soybeans. Weather-stressed grains and soybeans often have a lighter bushel weight than normal crops, and they can also contain mycotoxins or molds that produce mycotoxins. While these factors decrease the feeding value of thee crops to pigs, depending on the price discount or dock at the elevator, weather-stressed crops at a low enough price to make them viable alternative feedstuff for swine. The purpose of this factsheet is to help determine if, when, and how weather-stressed feedstuffs should be used in swine diets.


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Resources Reviewed

Factsheets

Scheduling All-In All-Out Swine Production

Publish Date: 07/02/2012

All-In–All-Out (AIAO) swine production is a system that keeps animals together in groups. Animals from different groups are not mixed during their stay on the farm. The groups are closely matched by age, weight, production stage and condition. The group is moved into a phase of production together, such as into an empty nursery, and is moved out of that phase as a group according to a production schedule. When a group moves forward, the facility is completely emptied. AIAO is the norm for most system production systems today. AIAO in an ideal world is by site, which is rarely practical. AIAO can also be by barn, room, “air space” or pen. In an AIAO system, sows are bred as groups to farrow during a 5- to 10-day period. By comparison, sows in a continuous flow system are bred continuously and farrow continuously. In a continuous flow system, pigs move as individuals, not as closely matched age groups, and a facility is never totally emptied because pigs or sows are always moving through it.


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Factsheets

Evaluating Performance and Management Practices in Pork Production

Publish Date: 05/09/2012

To conduct an effective farm evaluation, production and financial records must be used in combination with observation, diagnostic and analytical information and questioning people involved in different areas of production. Accurate records are essential and an understanding of both animal and human behavior is valuable. Remember that pork production is a biological process, be aware of natural variation that occurs and don’t overlook the obvious. Before changes are recommended they should be evaluated by weighing additional costs against expected benefits.


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Factsheets

Example Diets for Swine

Publish Date: 03/25/2010

The ability to properly formulate diets to achieve production goals and optimize profitability is essential for the success of any pork production operation. Swine diets are increasingly more complex with the emergence of improved nutritional technologies and greater availability and use of alternative feed ingredients. This factsheet is intended to teach key practical concepts and principles of swine nutrition and diet formulation through the presentation of diets made for various classes of swine.


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