Don D. Jones Purdue University

Resources Authored

Factsheets

Emergency Action Planning to Avoid or Minimize Manure Discharges from Pork Operations

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

This publication is intended to assist pork producers in developing an effective emergency action plan that will minimize the environmental and financial impacts to your operation which can result in the case of a manure release. While there will always be acts of nature, such as floods, hurricanes and tornadoes which cannot be anticipated or adequately planned for, it is possible to plan for other situations, such as a tanker spill, storage overflow, subsurface tile drainage, or runoff from a land application area. Good planning before any manure is applied and identification of potential weaknesses in the way manure is handled, stored or applied allows producers to correct deficiencies before catastrophic situations occur.


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Factsheets

Recirculation Systems for Manure Removal

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

Recirculation systems involve the addition of varying amounts of dilution water in order to improve the removal of manure from the animal area. The two types of recirculation systems used in pork production facilities are underslat flushing and pit recharge systems. Both systems use a shallow gutter that is flushed or drained periodically to remove waste from the building to the lagoon or storage basin. Open gutter systems have been used in the past but are no longer recommended because of concerns with disease transmission.


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Factsheets

Shallow Gutter Manure Collection Systems

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

Research has shown and field experience has verified that corrosive and odorous gas production increases with storage time and storage temperature. Manure can be removed from a swine barn by: (1) manual or mechanical scraping, (2) gravity draining, (3) flushing with dump tanks, siphons or pumping systems with automatic or manually controlled valves, or (4)…


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Resources Reviewed

PIG How-To's

Controlling Odors from Swine Operations

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Odors from swine operations can come from live animals, manure, dead animals and spoiled feed. The odors emitted are from the anaerobic breakdown of organic matter and proteins from these sources.


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Factsheets

Swine Manure Storage and Handling Practices to Minimize Odors

Publish Date: 04/09/2010

Odor from swine production systems is generated at three primary sources on the farm: animal housing, manure storage and handling, and during land application. This publication addresses controlling odors during the storage and handling of swine manure. While odor from manure storage and handling is emitted continuously, the amount of odor generated can vary. Increased odor release may occur during certain times of the year and during certain events, such as during agitation prior to land application. Odor reduction methods vary by type of manure storage structure and manure system management. Odor reduction may be achieved by management practices that minimize the formation, release and transport of odorous compounds.


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Factsheets

Siting and Building Considerations to Reduce Odor Potential from Swine Facilities

Publish Date: 04/09/2010

The best time to lower the potential for odor and odor complaints from any swine facility is before the site is constructed. Siting and building design have a tremendous influence on odor potential, not only through position relative to neighbors, highways, parks and municipalities, but also due to the communitys perception of odor potential.


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Factsheets

Why, How, and What to Keep? Environmental Records

Publish Date: 04/09/2010

Unless you are an accountant, record keeping is probably not your idea of fun. And, unlike your operation’s production records, you may not consider environmental records to be a necessity for your facility’s livelihood. However, kept properly, environmental records are beneficial to your facility, and in many cases, they are a requirement. As discussed here, environmental record keeping refers to items related to manure and nutrient management at and around the production facility. Environmental record keeping is a necessity for regulator-required nutrient and manure management plans (NMP or MMP) or for USDA’s Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMP). In this fact sheet we will discuss how keeping environmental records can benefit your facility, what records should be kept, and how you can incorporate the records into the overall management of your facility.


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Factsheets

Managing Market Pigs in Hoop Structures

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

Pork producers in the United States who are looking for lower cost structures for raising pigs have shown a great deal of interest in hoop structures or hooped shelters as facilities for housing market or finishing pigs. Producers need to be aware of the advantages and disadvantages of this type of housing. A number of manufacturers offer these units for sale, but little objective data are available to help producers decide if a hoop structure is a good investment. The information in this publication is intended to help producers and designers resolve some of the issues involved in using a hoop structure. The fact sheet discusses some of the management techniques that hoop structures require, and it presents economic factors that can be used to analyze the alternatives.


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