Scott Radcliffe Purdue University

Resources Reviewed

Factsheets

Macro Minerals for Swine Diets

Publish Date: 03/25/2010

Minerals constitute a small percentage of swine diets, but their importance to growth, health, and productivity of the pig cannot be over-emphasized. Swine require 15 minerals in their diet and macro-minerals are the minerals that swine need in larger quantities, usually described for inclusion in percent of the diet. The macro-minerals are: calcium, phosphorus, sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, and sulfur. About 5 percent of the total body weight of swine consists of minerals. Although these minerals are indigenous in most feed grains, some are at low concentrations in feedstuffs commonly used in swine diets. Consequently, it is essential that the diet be balanced using supplemental mineral sources. Minerals are essential for most of the basic metabolic reactions in the body and are an important factor in growth, reproduction, and resistance to diseases. They have a role in digestion; metabolism of protein, fats, and carbohydrates; and the structure of chromosomes, enzymes, nerves, blood, skeleton, hair and milk.


Read More Download PDF
Factsheets

Feed Additives for Swine

Publish Date: 06/04/2006

Feed additives are non-nutritive feed ingredients that are not required by swine. In the absence of feed additives in the diet, no deficiency symptoms will result. They may, however, enhance production and profitability under the right circumstances. Feed additives are regulated in the U. S. by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and it is very important that the regulations be followed. The official regulations can be found in the Feed Additive Compendium [1] for antibiotics and the AAFCO (Association of American Feed Control Officials) [2] guide which sets guidelines and definitions for animal feed use of additives that are generally regarded as safe (GRAS). For most users, the appropriate usage and withdrawal information is provided by the supplier and is on the feed tag. There are many classes of feed additives, including: antibiotics and antimicrobials, anthelmintics (de-wormers), direct-fed microbials (probiotics), prebiotics, pellet binders, flavors, enzymes, growth and feed efficiency enhancers, supplemental nutrients, mold inhibitors and preservatives, and a beta-adrenergic agonist (ractopamine).


Read More Download PDF