Sherrie Clark University of Illinois

Resources Authored

PIG How-To's

Recognizing and Reporting Foreign Animal Diseases

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

A foreign animal disease is one that does not occur in the United States and needs to be identified with the help of your veterinarian as quickly as possible.


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PIG How-To's

How To Monitor and Assist Difficult Farrowing

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Farrowing is the process of giving birth to piglets. Any condition that interferes with the normal process of giving birth can result in a difficult farrowing. It is important to know that piglets are delivered coming forwards or backwards and from either horn of the uterus. This will help you when you decide to assist in delivery of a piglet.


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PIG How-To's

Castration of Piglets

Publish Date: 11/10/2009

Castration is the surgical removal of the testicles from boar piglets. Removal of the testicles reduces the potential for odor and taint associated with male hormones in boars after puberty.


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Resources Reviewed

PIG How-To's

How To Protect Workers From Infection

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Good hygiene in the office and living areas of your production facility is important to protect the people working in these facilities from developing infections. The office, kitchen, break room, bathroom and showers can harbor microorganisms (bacteria, viruses or fungi) that can make people ill. Bacteria such as pseudomonas, methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and others are considered a risk for people sharing living areas such as army barracks. Pork production workers share shower and other facilities, and may also have some risk of spreading infections among each other. Additionally, some bacteria can cause illness in people if brought into the food preparation areas of the facility. However, by following some simple rules you can keep your facilities clean and safe for everyone.


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PIG How-To's

Preparing for a "Water Only" Show

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Many shows across the country today are water only shows, meaning that no foreign substances, such as oils or powders, can be used to dress the skin and hair on show day. Some packers have demanded this practice to prevent oils and other foreign substances from entering their packing plants. Other shows have implemented this rule to level the playing field for all exhibitors and make the hogs appear more natural in the showring. However, that does not mean that there is not some homework involved in making your pig look its best. Skin and hair conditioning take time and effort and should start at least a month prior to entering the showring.


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PIG How-To's

How to Manage Replacement Gilts for Breeding

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Replacement gilts are essential for maintaining the productivity of the sow breeding herd. Loss of sows from the breeding herd will result from failure to breed, to become pregnant, poor productivity, and structural problems with feet and legs. Producers must plan for current herd specific replacement rates that may average 50%. Managing females to meet replacement needs requires planning for the correct numbers of fertile, mature replacement gilts to breed at the same time as weaned sow groups.


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PIG How-To's

Maximizing the Value of Swine Manure

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Swine manure is a valuable by-product of the swine operation that can be utilized as a fertilizer resource. By conserving the nutrient value of the manure generated by the swine operation, less money can be spent on commercial fertilizer and there is a potential to market manure to local crop producers.


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PIG How-To's

Preparing a Finishing Barn

Publish Date: 04/17/2012

Most pathogens detrimental to the health and well being of pigs can be eliminated by effective cleaning and disinfection of facilities. In order to achieve optimal productivity and allow pigs to reach their full genetic potential, each new group of pigs must get off to the right start. The right start involves a clean, dry and disinfected environment that is properly ventilated and heated and/or cooled. The environment must also provide adequate access to feed and water, have sufficient space, and be free of objects that can cause injury. The steps to preparing a barn for a new group of pigs should be done systematically so as to avoid holes in biosecurity and preparedness.


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