Pork Safety

Factsheets

Alternative Curing

Publish Date: 07/08/2014

Curing is an ancient process, whereby meat was originally preserved by the addition of salt. In their textbook, “The Meat We Eat”, Romans et al., (2001) traced the origins of salt curing of meat to the Sumerian culture, which emerged in the Tigris and Euphrates valleys, approximately 4,000 B.C. It is commonly believed that the salt used in early meat curing was contaminated with salt peter (potassium nitrate), which contributed to a sustained, desirable red color of meat after exposure. Shortly after, additional benefits including a longer storage life before spoilage also were realized. As the industry developed, the additional multifunctional contributions of curing ingredients to cured meats became well-recognized.


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Thermometer Calibration

Publish Date: 04/22/2013


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Bacon Processing

Publish Date: 04/22/2013


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Sausage Processing

Publish Date: 04/22/2013


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Factsheets

STEC: Shiga-toxin Producing Escherichia coli in Pork

Publish Date: 05/03/2012

Escherichia coli, better known as E. coli, is a Gram-negative, rod shaped bacterium. It is a facultative anaerobe with an optimum growth temperature of 37°C (98.6°F), but is known to grow at temperatures as high as 49°C. Some strains of E. coli possess flagella, and are therefore, motile. E. coli encompass a wide range of bacteria that display diverse characteristics. Therefore, subdivisions are made to better distinguish this group of bacteria based on similar characteristics. Subdivisions of E. coli are called serotypes and are classified as such, based on two surface antigens. The O-antigen is found on the surface of the lipopolysaccharide layer of Gram- negative bacteria, while the H-antigen is a flagellar-surface antigen. The different groups of E. coli are often referred to by their O-group identification. Examples include E. coli O26 or O145.


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Salmonella as a Foodborne Pathogen in Pork

Publish Date: 07/19/2006

North Carolina State University Animal Science Fact Sheet ANS01-816S. Foodborne salmonellosis is a serious problem and one that must be addressed by our industry. Unfortunately, we have much to learn about how we can implement pre-harvest control. Until that time, farmers should strive to improve pen hygiene, implement an aggressive rodent control program and endorse…


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Food Security: Risks for the food supply

Publish Date: 06/06/2006

We take food for granted Abundance of inexpensive and safe food in the US contributes to sense of complacency with regard to food system Few understand the complexity and inter-relatedness of the food system High level of food security now assumed


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Food Security: The Important Role Producers Play

Publish Date: 06/06/2006

Undeniably, United States livestock and wildlife are at risk of the introduction of exotic contagious diseases. Many experts believe the risk of a foreign animal disease (FAD) introduction is increasing. This incursion could be the result of natural occurrences, an accident, or an intentional act of bioterrorism. The entry of a FAD into the U.S.…


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The Role of Production Practices on the Development of Antibiotic Resistance

Publish Date: 06/06/2006

Since their discovery in the mid 20th century, antibiotics have remained in extensive use for human and animal therapies. Application of antibiotics in agriculture has allowed producers to increase production and lower costs (1), reduce the environmental impact of livestock operations (2), and reduce the prevalence of pathogens (3). While continuing to provide significant benefits, some concern has arisen that extensive use of antibiotics in livestock production has led to an increased prevalence of drug resistant bacteria (4, 5), possibly affecting their usefulness in human medicine. Although a number of agencies have sponsored research and conferences to address this issue, the common consensus remains that too little information is available from which to derive strategies for control (6, 7). In particular, very limited information is available regarding the prevalence of resistance to more recent antibiotics used in livestock production; and little or no information is available with regard to management strategies to decrease the occurrence of resistance. Some reports suggest that animal stressors can influence antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with livestock (8, 9). These reports suggest that factors other than exposure to antibiotics may play a significant role in the development and/or prevalence of resistant organisms.


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