Swine Health

Videos

Environmental Sampling

Publish Date: 10/07/2015

Environmental sampling is an effective means of describing the health and drug residue status of swine populations. Environmental samples can be used to describe anything in the pigs' living area, such as pen floors, feeders and other barn equipment. This video will provide basic instructions of this simple technique for better on-farm health monitoring.


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Videos

Blood Collection in Swine

Publish Date: 10/07/2015

Blood collection, or "bleeding" is one of the most basic and useful skills for the swine practitioner. Serology from blood collection allows veterinarians to run several diagnostic tests, both in the face of disease outbreaks and for routine surveillance.


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Videos

Lactation

Publish Date: 10/07/2015

This video outlines swine lactation, which is one of the most critical factors in the husbandry and health of both sows and piglets. The lactating sow or gilt is the sole source of neonatal piglet nutrition and immunity. Proper lactation is essential for providing baby piglets the ability to grow, thrive, and be successfully weaned. Several management and biological factors play a role in swine lactation. This video will: - describe basic lactational physiology - troubleshoot any issues that may occur during lactation - briefly detail milk collection from the sow


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Factsheets

Lactation failure in the sow

Publish Date: 12/08/2014

Previously, lactation failure in swine was known as  MMA (Mastitis, Metritis, Agalactia) syndrome. Now it belongs to the Postpartum Dysgalactia Syndrome (PDS) and affects the optimum expression of the sows’ productive capacity in a way that is much less clinically visible. It is referred to as a syndrome to indicate that there may be several risk factors and clinical signs that are referred to collectively as lactation failure or, more exactly, an early and temporary dysgalactia (i.e. reduced or insufficient milk production). MMA can be seen as the emerging part of an iceberg represented by PDS, which is the more important and underestimated part and thus most dangerous. It is a major concern to pork producer because of the economic impact although it is difficult to quantify.


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Factsheets

Identification of the Sick or Compromised Pig

Publish Date: 10/23/2014

A compromised animal, in biological terms, refers to an animal which is unable to function optimally. Observing pigs daily, by walking the pens will contribute to early identification of compromised pigs (1,2). In order to identify sick pigs, it is important to know what a normal, healthy group of pigs should look like. This fact sheet provides illustrations and a system, to be used as a tool, for assessing nursery pigs. This tool systematically assesses the body, eyes/ears/nose, skin/hair, and temperament which can easily be remembered by the acronym B.E.S.T


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Factsheets

Porcine pleuropneumonia (PPP) caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App)

Publish Date: 10/29/2013

Porcine pleuropneumonia (PPP) caused by the Gram-negative bacteria Actinobacilluspleuropneumoniae (App) occurs throughout the world. It is rather well controlled in the United States and Canada, however PPP remains a major concern in many Latin-American, Asian and European countries.


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PIG How-To's

Safe Disposal of Veterinary Pharmaceuticals

Publish Date: 05/15/2013

Pharmaceutical compounds are increasingly being detected at low levels in ground and surface waters. Although environmental concentrations of pharmaceuticals measured to date are far lower than the intended therapeutic doses, there is concern that the potential exists for these chemicals to have an adverse impact on aquatic life and human health. Disposal of pharmaceutical compounds is becoming a complex environmental issue. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), little is known about the potential health effects to humans or aquatic organisms exposed to the low levels of most of the chemicals or mixtures commonly found in their studies. But the safety and health of the environment is directly affected by the disposal method, so it is important that we all be responsible when disposing of these products. Presently, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) does not offer specific guidelines for disposal of pharmaceutical waste, but they do offer an educational video on the subject, available by visiting www.avma.org and searching “drug disposal”.


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Factsheets

Bloody Scours (Swine Dysentery) A costly RE-EMERGING disease that is preventable

Publish Date: 05/22/2013

In the past few years an expensive swine disease that had largely disappeared has begun to re-emerge in a few Eastern and Midwestern as well as Canadian swine operations. Swine dysentery (SD or bloody scours) is a “gut” disease which is very expensive to treat medically and difficult to effectively remove once pigs and facilities are contaminated. SD is carried by infected swine, other animals in contact with infected swine, as well as small amounts of manure adhered to equipment or clothing. Biosecurity steps that can reduce these exposure risks, and protect your facilities and investments should be immediately implemented to slow the spread of this disease. Your swine veterinarian can assist you in diagnostics and biosecurity plan formulation to protect your herd.


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Factsheets

Streptococcus Suis Disease in Pigs

Publish Date: 05/23/2013

Streptococcus suis infection is a significant disease in intensive, indoor swine operations. Strep suis is now the most common cause of meningitis in pigs submitted to veterinary diagnostic laboratories. Furthermore, there has been a marked increase in Strep suis cases in nursery pigs from herds that have experienced an outbreak of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS). Strep suis is a bacterium living in the tonsils of most pigs and capable of causing disease in the brain (meningitis) and other organs (septicemia). While Strep suis is most often associated with meningitis, other manifestations caused by Strep suis include polyserositis, arthritis, valvular endocarditis, myocarditis, pericarditis and abortion. It is also considered a secondary agent of pneumonia. There are several types of Strep suis. In North America, Types 2 and 3, followed by Types 1/2, 7, and 8 are most prevalent, but types may slightly vary depending on location.


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Factsheets

Transmissible Gastroenteritis (TGE)

Publish Date: 08/29/2013

Among the economically important diarrheal diseases of baby pigs, transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) remains a cause of sickness and death. All age groups are susceptible. When the disease strikes a seronegative (antibody-free) herd at the time of farrowing, it is not unusual to lose most (often 100%) of the pigs farrowed under 3 weeks of age. A milder enzootic form of TGE, associated with chronic or intermittent episodes of diarrhea usually in 1- to 3-week-old suckling or recently weaned pigs, occurs in partially immune (seropositive) herds that have continuous farrowing or where pigs are regularly added or mixed. After a distinct respiratory variant of TGE (porcine respiratory coronavirus or PRCV) has spread throughout most parts of the world (first in Europe, and then in the US in the 1980’s) occurrences of TGE have become more sporadic. Although accurate statistics are not available, the disease is still reported from parts of Europe, North America and Asia. Serologic surveys indicate that enzootic TGE is widespread throughout the US. Porcine respiratory coronavirus infections have complicated the diagnosis of TGE by generating cross-reactive antibodies that cannot be differentiated using conventional serologic tests, even though they are usually associated with only mild respiratory disease or sub-clinical infections.


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