Margaret Hardin Sarah Lee Corporation

Resources Reviewed

Factsheets

STEC: Shiga-toxin Producing Escherichia coli in Pork

Publish Date: 05/03/2012

Escherichia coli, better known as E. coli, is a Gram-negative, rod shaped bacterium. It is a facultative anaerobe with an optimum growth temperature of 37°C (98.6°F), but is known to grow at temperatures as high as 49°C. Some strains of E. coli possess flagella, and are therefore, motile. E. coli encompass a wide range of bacteria that display diverse characteristics. Therefore, subdivisions are made to better distinguish this group of bacteria based on similar characteristics. Subdivisions of E. coli are called serotypes and are classified as such, based on two surface antigens. The O-antigen is found on the surface of the lipopolysaccharide layer of Gram- negative bacteria, while the H-antigen is a flagellar-surface antigen. The different groups of E. coli are often referred to by their O-group identification. Examples include E. coli O26 or O145.


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Factsheets

National Pork Retail Microbiological Baseline

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

Several studies have either been completed or are currently in progress to determine the presence of indicator and/or pathogenic microorganisms on pork carcasses.1,2,3 Investigations such as these have increased our understanding of the populations and species of microorganisms that may be found on pork due to cross-contamination or poor handling/processing practices. Most studies have concentrated on the carcass; however, pork can subsequently be re-contaminated with bacteria during fabrication, packaging, distribution, and retail preparation and, therefore, more information on contamination levels and pathogen incidences following such practices must be gathered.


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Factsheets

Findings of the National Pork Board Salmonella Intervention Assist Program for Small & Very Small Plants

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

The National Pork Board began the Salmonella Assistance Intervention Program (SAIP) in 2000. This program targeted primarily small and very small meat packers who were having difficulty meeting the requirements of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDAFSIS) Salmonella standards. The FSIS set Salmonella performance standards to verify whether SSOP/ HACCP systems are effective in controlling contamination with harmful bacteria. According to USDA, Salmonella was selected because; (1) it is the most common bacterial cause of foodborne illness; (2) FSIS baseline data shows that it colonizes a variety of mammals and birds and occurs at a frequency which permits changes to be detected; (3) current methodologies can recover Salmonella from a variety of meat and poultry products; and (4) intervention strategies aimed at reducing fecal contamination and other sources of Salmonella on raw products should be effective against other pathogens. Detailed guidelines related to the USDA-FSIS response to Salmonella Performance Standards failures by plants may be found at the following web site: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/OPPDE/rdad/FSISNotices/28-02.htm.


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Factsheets

Current Issues for Country Cured Hams

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

Country-Cured hams are a small, yet significant part of the pork industry. In fact, Country-Cured hams, and their related products, can easily be classified as one of the original value-added products. In an industry where most products are considered value-added due to the improved yields related to weight gain from added water bound by non-meat ingredients, country-cured hams and other dry-cured products are differentiated on their unique process to remove moisture from the product.


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Factsheets

Meat Inspection

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

The safety of the foods we eat is the responsibility of every person in contact with it from the farm to the dining table. No matter how effective one segment of the food industry is in ensuring a safe food product, that effort can be compromised by the nest segment in the food chain. Municipal, county, state, and national governmental agencies are responsible for overseeing food production, distribution, procurement, and preparation to assure that food made available to consumers is safe.


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