Robert T. Burns Iowa State University

Resources Authored

Factsheets

Swine Manure and Land Application Practices to Minimize Odors

Publish Date: 04/13/2012

Odor from swine production systems is generated at three primary sources: animal housing, manure storage and during land application. This publication addresses controlling odors during land application of swine manure. Unlike odor generation from animal housing and manure storage, which are usually continuous in nature, odor from manure application is an “event-based” occurrence. The majority of odor complaints associated with animal operations are associated with the land application of manure. In order for odor to result in a complaint, the odor must be generated, released to the air, and transported down wind where people are located. Therefore, odor control methods could involve methods that minimize the generation, release or transport of odorous compounds.


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Factsheets

Swine Manure Storage and Handling Practices to Minimize Odors

Publish Date: 04/09/2010

Odor from swine production systems is generated at three primary sources on the farm: animal housing, manure storage and handling, and during land application. This publication addresses controlling odors during the storage and handling of swine manure. While odor from manure storage and handling is emitted continuously, the amount of odor generated can vary. Increased odor release may occur during certain times of the year and during certain events, such as during agitation prior to land application. Odor reduction methods vary by type of manure storage structure and manure system management. Odor reduction may be achieved by management practices that minimize the formation, release and transport of odorous compounds.


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Factsheets

Comprehensive Nutrient Management Planning for Your Pork Production Operation

Publish Date: 09/24/2007

The Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan (CNMP) concept has been developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) to address conservation planning for animal feeding operations. Additionally, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes that CNMPs address the requirements of the Nutrient Management Plan necessary for the maintenance of a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit [1]. National USDA policy states that animal feeding operations should have a CNMP to be eligible to receive certain cost-share funding, such as Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) assistance. In 2002, the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act (Farm Bill) increased the amount of conservation program funds available to animal feeding operations, and introduced the mechanism for using certified Technical Service Providers (TSP) as a source of technical assistance for producers. Producers can contact a TSP, request the development of a CNMP and then potentially be reimbursed for a TSP’s services with conservation program funds, depending on fund availability in their state.


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Factsheets

Energy and Nutrient Recovery from Swine Manures

Publish Date: 06/03/2006

While the primary method of swine manure management in the United States is temporary storage followed by land application as crop fertilizer, there is increasing interest in recovering energy and nutrients from manures prior to land application. Insufficient nutrient assimilation capacity in nearby crop land, or interest in adding value to swine manure beyond the fertilizer value, are among the reasons that alternative management strategies may be sought. Producers who consider alternative manure uses will find many options available. This publication describes several energy and nutrient recovery processes currently available. Each process is explained and primary issues that a producer should consider with each process are discussed.


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