Pork Safety

Factsheets

Alternative Curing

Publish Date: 07/08/2014

Curing impacts meat product attributes, resulting in unique product characteristics, when compared to fresh meat products. Traditionally, meat curing has been associated with processed meats for the purpose of altering color, flavor, safety, and shelf-life characteristics (Sebranek & Fox, 1985).


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Thermometer Calibration

Publish Date: 04/22/2013


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Factsheets

The Influence of Paylean (Ractopamine Hydrochloride) on Pork Quality

Publish Date: 12/13/2012

Marketed under the trade-name Paylean™ (Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, IN), ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) is a phenethanolamine β-adrenergic agonist used as a feed supplement to redirect nutrients to improve live pig performance (daily gain and feed conversion efficiency) and fat-free lean yields in pork carcasses [1]. Research was initiated in the 1980’s and RAC was FDA-approved for inclusion in swine finishing diets in December 1999. Initial approval included an inclusion range of 4.5 to 18 g/ton and fed from 150 to 240 lb. In 2006, the label changed to include an inclusion range from 4.5 to 9 g/ton of feed and to be fed for the last 50 to 90 lbs of body weight gain prior to market. This overview summarizes all levels of Paylean feeding; however, as producers consider the current, approved feeding level, more emphasis should be placed on the 4.5 to 9 g/ton data. The specific focus of the factsheet is an overview of the effects of RAC on fresh pork quality and cooked pork palatability.


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References

Bacon Processing

Publish Date: 04/22/2013


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Sausage Processing

Publish Date: 04/22/2013


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Factsheets

STEC: Shiga-toxin Producing Escherichia coli in Pork

Publish Date: 05/03/2012

Escherichia coli, better known as E. coli, is a Gram-negative, rod shaped bacterium. It is a facultative anaerobe with an optimum growth temperature of 37°C (98.6°F), but is known to grow at temperatures as high as 49°C. Some strains of E. coli possess flagella, and are therefore, motile. E. coli encompass a wide range of bacteria that display diverse characteristics. Therefore, subdivisions are made to better distinguish this group of bacteria based on similar characteristics. Subdivisions of E. coli are called serotypes and are classified as such, based on two surface antigens. The O-antigen is found on the surface of the lipopolysaccharide layer of Gram- negative bacteria, while the H-antigen is a flagellar-surface antigen. The different groups of E. coli are often referred to by their O-group identification. Examples include E. coli O26 or O145.


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Factsheets

Consumer Attitudes Towards Color and Marbling of Fresh Pork

Publish Date: 05/15/2012

Humans use color and marbling to judge the ‘value’ or quality of a product, often comparing and choosing a product based on expectations and past experiences. Choices made based on visual evaluation, which requires no physical contact, pose very little risk; therefore, when a product does not meet ‘color expectations’, it is an easy decision to deem a product ‘unacceptable’. Color and marbling influences purchasing decisions as to whether a food is acceptable for consumption so measuring these aspects are important to the industry.


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Factsheets

Consumer Attitudes: What They Say and What They Do

Publish Date: 04/09/2010

There are 3,000 US companies producing meat products with combined annual revenue of about $85 billion (Research and Markets Ltd., 2009). They produce about 40 billion pounds of beef products per year, and 30 billion pounds of pork. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of factors that affect consumer behavior regarding pork purchase and consumption which may allow the pork industry to maximize demand for pork in the marketplace and successfully compete with other animal protein sources.


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References

Salmonella as a Foodborne Pathogen in Pork

Publish Date: 07/19/2006

North Carolina State University Animal Science Fact Sheet ANS01-816S. Foodborne salmonellosis is a serious problem and one that must be addressed by our industry. Unfortunately, we have much to learn about how we can implement pre-harvest control. Until that time, farmers should strive to improve pen hygiene, implement an aggressive rodent control program and endorse…


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